indigenist

Advocating for Indigenous Genius, Indigeneity and Wellbeing


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I had the honour and privilege of hearing @LawladyINM #IdleNoMore speak last year in Winnipeg

Sometimes you have to be the voice where no voice is heard, even if its a whisper. Sometimes courage is that whisper to keep breathing one day at a time because sometimes that is enough. Our breath is the same breath our ancestors took when we still had our freedom and liberation, so we will again. Sometimes hope is enough for a dream to take hold, a vision, a prayer, a song.

Idle No More

I had the honour and privilege of being in the presence of this humbled, inspirational greatness of a woman.

Miigwetch

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Please heed this message if you plan on working with Indigenous people or communities

If you’ve come here to help me…

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Participating with the view of being part of the liberation of Indigenous people is the single most overlooked and fundamental principle of genuinely inclusive work. Being part of the liberation is also knowing when you are required and a good indication of that is when you have been asked. Don’t let an over-zealous sense of entitlement to charity or benevolence be your motivation. Also pay attention to the research. Cultural continuity is a protective factor


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“Evaluation by us, for us”: What is required of AES to strengthen, advance and support Indigenous Evaluation? – A workshop for Indigenous participants only

“Evaluation by us, for us”: What is required of AES to strengthen, advance and support Indigenous Evaluation? – A workshop for Indigenous participants only

presented by Amohia Boulton; Whakauae Research for Māori Health and Development; New Zealand

The AES Constitution currently makes no mention of the unique place Indigenous peoples have in the make-up of societies in and around the Pacific, including Australia and New Zealand. Indigenous evaluation, as the ontological and epistemological expression of the lived reality of Indigenous peoples, as theory and as practice, is however, increasingly being recognised as a legitimate discipline in its own right. Furthermore, Indigenous evaluation – evaluation undertaken by Indigenous peoples for Indigenous peoples – is being demanded by Indigenous communities who are often in receipt of services and programmes developed without their input or consultation. Indigenous evaluation is regarded by these communities therefore, as an emancipatory and transformative force.

Despite the constitutional “silence” on the issue of Indigenous peoples, the AES Board is keen to advance and support the field of Indigenous evaluation as appropriate, and seeks guidance on how to do this from Indigenous participants at the 2014 conference. In this facilitated workshop for Indigenous participants only, workshop attendees will be asked to identify the key issues in Indigenous Evaluation in our wider Pacific region; how the AES can best support the growth and advancement of Indigenous Evaluation in our region; and how the AES can best support the growth and development of Indigenous members of the Society.

NOTE: This workshop is for Indigenous participants only.

Link : http://conference2014.aes.asn.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18&Itemid=142#m4


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Great for Indigenous #SuicidePrevention Research – The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies by Linda Tuhiwai Smith

The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies by Linda Tuhiwai Smith

After a long awaited 13 years, the new Second Edition of the best-selling methodology textbook is finally here.

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The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies by Linda Tuhiwai Smith has been heavily updated with:
* A brand NEW Foreword
* Entire NEW Chapter 11
* Substantially revised chapter 5, 7, 8 and Conclusion

The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies will be the essential textbook for anyone involved in researching indigenous people, and a classic text in research methodology.

To the colonized, the term “research” is conflated with colonialism; academic research steeped in imperialism remains a painful reality. This essential volume explores intersections of imperialism and research – specifically, the ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and tradition as “regimes of truth.” Concepts such as “discovery” and “claiming” are discussed and an argument presented that the decolonization of research methods will help to reclaim control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Now in its eagerly awaited second edition, this bestselling book has been substantially revised, with new case studies and examples and important additions on new indigenous literature and the role of research in indigenous struggles for social justice, which brings this essential volume urgently up-to-date.

From Amazon : http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1848139500?pc_redir=1409632218&robot_redir=1


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Voices from the Black Rainbow – Indigenous LGBQTI in Suicide Prevention: SDOH and Intersectionality

Voices from the Black Rainbow – Indigenous LGBQTI in Suicide Prevention: SDOH Intersectionality©Indigenist

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To reference : Bonson, D 2014 1997, ‘Voices from the Black Rainbow – Indigenous LGBQTI in Suicide Prevention: SDOH and Intersectionality, paper presented at the Equity @ the Centre: Action on Social Determinants of Health, 22nd National Australian Health Promotion Association Conference & 18th Chronic Diseases Network Conference, Alice Springs, 4-5th September.


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Previous and Upcoming Presentations 2010 -2014

In 2014

Upcoming

Keynote at 12th International Narrative Therapy and Community Work Conference in Adelaide this November

http://www.dulwichcentre.com.au/conference.html

Previous

Equity @ the Centre: Action on Social Determinants of Health – 22nd National Australian Health Promotion Association Conference & 18th Chronic Diseases Network Conference, Alice Springs this September

Voices from the Black Rainbow Indigenous LGBQTI people in suicide prevention – Intersectionality and SDOH.

Indigenous Peoples Networking Zone – International World AIDS conference, Melbourne 

Decolonising gender identity and sexuality in Indigenous Australia

Suicide Prevention Australia Conference – One Goal, Many Communities – Perth – Australia (2014)

Voices from the Black Rainbow Indigenous LGBQTI Sistergirls and Brotherboys in Suicide Prevention

International Joint Social Work and Social Development Conference – Promoting Social and Economic Equality: Responses from Social Work and Social Development – Melbourne – Australia (2014)

A culturally responsive social work application of Indigenous and western ways of thinking and doing when responding to Indigenous sexual diversity in a young Indigenous male client.

MindOUT Courageous Voices – Seeds of Transformation, Sydney – Australia 2014

Plenary Speaker “Indigeneity and Diverse Gender and Sexuality” Voices from the Black Rainbow Indigenous LGBQTI Sistergirls and Brotherboys in Suicide Prevention

Human Right Forum “Power Through Action”, Darwin – Australia (2014)

Workshop – Echoes of the Forgotten Mob, Indigenous LGBQTI Sistergirls and Brotherboys in Suicide Prevention

In 2013

The National Men’s Health Gathering and 7th National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Male Health Convention, Brisbane – Australia (2013)

Believe the Hype – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males Engage

Gay Men’s health is Men’s Health – The Heteronormativity in Men’s Health and its exclusion of Gay Men

2nd International Indigenous Voices in Social Work Conference, Winnipeg – Canada (2013)

Male, going bush (remote Australia), & into the comfort zone
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males in Suicide Prevention

National Social and Emotional Wellbeing Workforce Gathering, Brisbane – Australia (2012)

Suicide Prevention in the North West (Kimberley)

In 2010

The 7th Annual LGBTI Health Conference, Social Inclusion, Exclusion and Resilience: A Social View of Health in 2010

The Colonisation of Desire


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Cultural Continuity as a Hedge Against Suicide in Canada’s First Nations

Cultural Continuity as a Hedge Against Suicide in Canada’s First Nations

Michael J. Chandler
The University of British Columbia

Christopher E. Lalonde
The University of British Columbia

Abstract

This research report examines self-continuity and its role as a protective factor against suicide. First, we review the notions of personal and cultural continuity and their relevance to understanding suicide among First Nations youth. The central theoretical idea developed here is that, because it is constitutive of what it means to have or be a self to somehow count oneself as continuous in time, anyone whose identity is undermined by radical personal and cultural change is put at special risk to suicide for the reason that they lose those future commitments that are necessary to guarantee appropriate care and concern for their own well-being. It is for just such reasons that adolescents and young adults—who are living through moments of especially dra- matic change—constitute such a high risk group. This generalized period of increased risk during adolescence can be made even more acute within communities that lack a concomitant sense of cultural continuity that might otherwise support the efforts of young persons to develop more adequate self-continuity warranting practices. Next, we present data to demonstrate that, while certain indigenous or First Nations groups do in fact suffer dramatically elevated suicide rates, such rates vary widely across British Columbia’s nearly 200 aboriginal groups: some communi- ties show rates 800 times the national average, while in others suicide is essentially unknown. Finally, we demonstrate that these variable incidence rates are strongly associated with the degree to which BC’s 196 bands are engaged in community practices that are employed as markers of a collective effort to rehabilitate and vouchsafe the cultural continuity of these groups. Communi- ties that have taken active steps to preserve and rehabilitate their own cultures are shown to be those in which youth suicide rates are dramatically lower.

FULL pdf  Chandler & Lalonde -1998 – Cultural continuity as a hedge against suicide