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Advocating for Indigenous Genius, Indigeneity and Wellbeing


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Great for Indigenous #SuicidePrevention Research – The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies by Linda Tuhiwai Smith

The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies by Linda Tuhiwai Smith

After a long awaited 13 years, the new Second Edition of the best-selling methodology textbook is finally here.

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The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies by Linda Tuhiwai Smith has been heavily updated with:
* A brand NEW Foreword
* Entire NEW Chapter 11
* Substantially revised chapter 5, 7, 8 and Conclusion

The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies will be the essential textbook for anyone involved in researching indigenous people, and a classic text in research methodology.

To the colonized, the term “research” is conflated with colonialism; academic research steeped in imperialism remains a painful reality. This essential volume explores intersections of imperialism and research – specifically, the ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and tradition as “regimes of truth.” Concepts such as “discovery” and “claiming” are discussed and an argument presented that the decolonization of research methods will help to reclaim control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Now in its eagerly awaited second edition, this bestselling book has been substantially revised, with new case studies and examples and important additions on new indigenous literature and the role of research in indigenous struggles for social justice, which brings this essential volume urgently up-to-date.

From Amazon : http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1848139500?pc_redir=1409632218&robot_redir=1


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Voices from the Black Rainbow – Indigenous LGBQTI in Suicide Prevention: SDOH and Intersectionality

Voices from the Black Rainbow – Indigenous LGBQTI in Suicide Prevention: SDOH Intersectionality©Indigenist

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To reference : Bonson, D 2014 1997, ‘Voices from the Black Rainbow – Indigenous LGBQTI in Suicide Prevention: SDOH and Intersectionality, paper presented at the Equity @ the Centre: Action on Social Determinants of Health, 22nd National Australian Health Promotion Association Conference & 18th Chronic Diseases Network Conference, Alice Springs, 4-5th September.


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Previous and Upcoming Presentations 2010 -2014

In 2014

Upcoming

Keynote at 12th International Narrative Therapy and Community Work Conference in Adelaide this November

http://www.dulwichcentre.com.au/conference.html

Previous

Equity @ the Centre: Action on Social Determinants of Health – 22nd National Australian Health Promotion Association Conference & 18th Chronic Diseases Network Conference, Alice Springs this September

Voices from the Black Rainbow Indigenous LGBQTI people in suicide prevention – Intersectionality and SDOH.

Indigenous Peoples Networking Zone – International World AIDS conference, Melbourne 

Decolonising gender identity and sexuality in Indigenous Australia

Suicide Prevention Australia Conference – One Goal, Many Communities – Perth – Australia (2014)

Voices from the Black Rainbow Indigenous LGBQTI Sistergirls and Brotherboys in Suicide Prevention

International Joint Social Work and Social Development Conference – Promoting Social and Economic Equality: Responses from Social Work and Social Development – Melbourne – Australia (2014)

A culturally responsive social work application of Indigenous and western ways of thinking and doing when responding to Indigenous sexual diversity in a young Indigenous male client.

MindOUT Courageous Voices – Seeds of Transformation, Sydney – Australia 2014

Plenary Speaker “Indigeneity and Diverse Gender and Sexuality” Voices from the Black Rainbow Indigenous LGBQTI Sistergirls and Brotherboys in Suicide Prevention

Human Right Forum “Power Through Action”, Darwin – Australia (2014)

Workshop – Echoes of the Forgotten Mob, Indigenous LGBQTI Sistergirls and Brotherboys in Suicide Prevention

In 2013

The National Men’s Health Gathering and 7th National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Male Health Convention, Brisbane – Australia (2013)

Believe the Hype – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males Engage

Gay Men’s health is Men’s Health – The Heteronormativity in Men’s Health and its exclusion of Gay Men

2nd International Indigenous Voices in Social Work Conference, Winnipeg – Canada (2013)

Male, going bush (remote Australia), & into the comfort zone
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males in Suicide Prevention

National Social and Emotional Wellbeing Workforce Gathering, Brisbane – Australia (2012)

Suicide Prevention in the North West (Kimberley)

In 2010

The 7th Annual LGBTI Health Conference, Social Inclusion, Exclusion and Resilience: A Social View of Health in 2010

The Colonisation of Desire


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Cultural Continuity as a Hedge Against Suicide in Canada’s First Nations

Cultural Continuity as a Hedge Against Suicide in Canada’s First Nations

Michael J. Chandler
The University of British Columbia

Christopher E. Lalonde
The University of British Columbia

Abstract

This research report examines self-continuity and its role as a protective factor against suicide. First, we review the notions of personal and cultural continuity and their relevance to understanding suicide among First Nations youth. The central theoretical idea developed here is that, because it is constitutive of what it means to have or be a self to somehow count oneself as continuous in time, anyone whose identity is undermined by radical personal and cultural change is put at special risk to suicide for the reason that they lose those future commitments that are necessary to guarantee appropriate care and concern for their own well-being. It is for just such reasons that adolescents and young adults—who are living through moments of especially dra- matic change—constitute such a high risk group. This generalized period of increased risk during adolescence can be made even more acute within communities that lack a concomitant sense of cultural continuity that might otherwise support the efforts of young persons to develop more adequate self-continuity warranting practices. Next, we present data to demonstrate that, while certain indigenous or First Nations groups do in fact suffer dramatically elevated suicide rates, such rates vary widely across British Columbia’s nearly 200 aboriginal groups: some communi- ties show rates 800 times the national average, while in others suicide is essentially unknown. Finally, we demonstrate that these variable incidence rates are strongly associated with the degree to which BC’s 196 bands are engaged in community practices that are employed as markers of a collective effort to rehabilitate and vouchsafe the cultural continuity of these groups. Communi- ties that have taken active steps to preserve and rehabilitate their own cultures are shown to be those in which youth suicide rates are dramatically lower.

FULL pdf  Chandler & Lalonde -1998 – Cultural continuity as a hedge against suicide


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#DefiningMoments – Storified and HT @leesawatego #auspol

#DefiningMoments

Yesterday the Prime Minister Tony Abbott launched the National Museum of Australia’s Defining Moments project. The Prime Minister’s comments in his launch speech were undiplomatic and continued to privilege conservative White views of Australian history. Many on Twitter responded.

A few examples in pictorial viewing

Defining Moment  Screen Shot 2014-08-30 at 12.30.59 pm  Defining MomentsScreen Shot 2014-08-30 at 12.30.00 pm

Defining Moments Defining Moments

 


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A culturally responsive decolonised methodology combining Indigenous and western ways of thinking….

12th International Narrative Therapy and Community Work Conference

A culturally responsive decolonised methodology combining Indigenous and western ways of thinking and doing when responding to Indigenous sexual diversity in a young Indigenous male client..

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More on the conference here Dulwich Centre

©Indigenist


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I turned down an radio interview today and here’s why…..

I turned down an radio interview today and here’s why…..

The subject matter that I was being interviewed for is the heightened risk or as I have written here the amplification of the risk of suicidality for Indigenous LGBQTI populations here in Australia.

About the topic here’s what we know. LGBTI people are said to have the highest rates of self-harm and suicide of any population in Australia. Same-sex attracted Australians are said to exhibit up to 14-times-higher rates of suicide attempts than their heterosexual peers. Yet, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, there were 996 suicides reported across Australia between 2001 and 2010 among Indigenous peoples. We are told that 1.6 per cent of all Australians die by suicide but for Indigenous peoples, this rate is more than 4.2 per cent, or one in every 24.

This logic (very preliminary) model below, which non-creatively, I’ve called ‘Bonson’s Logic‘ (2014) indicates on the left hand side, in BLUE boxes, the social determinants of health (SDOH) that are attributed to the Indigenous Australian community. Above that is a GREEN box with Social and Emotional distress written. The SDOH cause Social and Emotional distress. In the ORANGE box you will see the terms ‘Gender Variant and Sexuality Diverse’ this is another way of explaining LGBQTI (it is also my now preferred way when I am writing and giving presentations). As you can see following the ORANGE box are two more boxes. They are coloured PURPLE. One says Perceived and the other says Actual under a BLACK box that says threats. The types of threats are then split into two types of aggressions (micro or macro) based on Non-acceptance and Homophobia; they are the GREEN boxes. Non-acceptance is a decolonized view of homophobia insomuch that it removes the colonial constructed religious type of homophobia (Adam and Eve not Adam and Steve etc.) What follows is another column of BLUE boxes, again listing the SDOH. Now at the over the top of the Bonson’s Logic model you will see a BLACK arrow, this is to indicate the SDOH affecting Indigenous populations carries over and is added to the SDOH that can be experienced because you identify as LGBQTI or Gender Variant and Sexuality Diverse. The last box in RED is suicide. There is no linkages yet, because they are yet to established from an evidence base.

Bonson Logic 2014

 
So if we hypothesise the math that one in every 24 Indigenous deaths is by suicide and that Same-sex attracted people are said to exhibit up to 14-times-higher rates of suicide attempts than their heterosexual peers, how many of that one in every 24 is because they are Indigenous LGBQTI is quite troubling.

So why did I turn down the radio interview ? 

It was not going to be placed online. That simple. A ten minute interview that if you happen to catch “on air” vs. it being uploaded (very easy to do – 2 of my last interviews have been). Having it, in full or in part, means giving value to the topic and more accessible, and less by virtue of the happenstance opportunity of catching it on air. And thats key. If it was too be uploaded it would’ve been given the value it deserves.

Also, simply getting interviewed isn’t an outcome. That may be for the journalist, to get interviews. Its the message and how far it can be shared that is the outcome, at least for me anyways.

Visibility so important. Representation is important. Indigenous LGBTI people (we) are important.

Also, from my experience the mitigation of socio-environmental circumstances that are a causation for distress is suicide prevention done right.

©Indigenist


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Ally Bill of Responsibilities © Dr. Lynn Gehl, Algonquin Anishinaabe-kwe

Ally Bill of Responsibilities © Dr. Lynn Gehl, Algonquin Anishinaabe-kwe

 

Ally Bill of Responsibilities

  1. Do not act out of guilt, but rather out of a genuine interest in challenging the larger oppressive power structures;
  2. Understand that they are secondary to the Indigenous people that they are working with and that they seek to serve. They and their needs must take a back seat;
  3. Are fully grounded in their own ancestral history and culture. Effective allies must sit in this knowledge with confidence and pride; otherwise the “wannabe syndrome” could merely undermine the Indigenous people’s efforts;
  4. Are aware of their privileges and openly discuss them. This action will also serve to challenge larger oppressive power structures;
  5. Reflect on and embrace their ignorance of the group’s oppression and always hold this ignorance in the forefront of their minds. Otherwise, a lack of awareness of their ignorance could merely perpetuate the Indigenous people’s oppression;
  6. Are aware of and understand the larger oppressive power structures that serve to hold certain groups and people down. One way to do this is to draw parallels through critically reflecting on their own experiences with oppressive power structures. Reflecting on their subjectivity in this way, they ensure critical thought or what others call objectivity. In taking this approach, these parallels will serve to ensure that non-Indigenous allies are not perpetuating the oppression;
  7. Constantly listen and reflect through the medium of subjectivity and critical thought versus merely their subjectivity. This will serve to ensure that they avoid the trap that they or their personal friends know what is best. This act will also serve to avoid the trap of naively following a leader or for that matter a group of leaders;
  8. Strive to remain critical thinkers and seek out the knowledge and wisdom of the critical thinkers in the group. Allies cannot assume that all people are critical thinkers and have a good understanding of the larger power structures of oppression;
  9. Ensure that a community consensus, or understanding, has been established in terms of their role as allies. Otherwise, the efforts of the people will be undermined due to a lack of consultation and agreement;
  10. Ensure that the needs of the most oppressed – women, children, elderly, young teenage girls and boys, and the disabled – are served in the effort or movement that they are supporting. Otherwise, they may be engaging in a process that is inadequate and thus merely serving to fortify the larger power structures of oppression. Alternatively, their good intentions may not serve those who need the effort most. Rather, they may be making the oppression worse;
  11. Understand and reflect on the prevalence and dynamics of lateral oppression and horizontal violence on and within oppressed groups and components of the group, such as women, and seek to ensure that their actions do not encourage it;
  12. Ensure that they are supporting a leader’s, group of leaders’, or a movement’s efforts that serve the needs of the people. For example, do the community people find this leader’s efforts useful, interesting, engaging, and thus empowering? If not, allies should consider whether the efforts are moving in a questionable or possibly an inadequate direction, or worse yet that their efforts are being manipulated and thus undermined, possibly for economic and political reasons;
  13. Understand that sometimes allies are merely manipulatively chosen to further a leader’s agenda versus the Indigenous Nations’, communities’, or organizations’ concerns, and when this situation occurs act accordingly;
  14. Do not take up the space and resources, physical and financial, of the oppressed group;
  15. Do not take up time at community meetings and community events. This is not their place. They must listen more than speak. Allies cannot perceive all the larger oppressive power structures as clearly as members of the oppressed group can; And finally,
  16. Accept the responsibility of learning and reading more about their role as effective allies.

Chi-Miigwetch!

You can download these on PDF here


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Privilege Discomfort: Why You Need to Get the F*ck Over It via

Privilege Discomfort: Why You Need to Get the Fuck Over It

There exists a kind of vacuum effect that occurs when people, particularly people who are privileged (which most of us are in some manner or another), read or learn information about the manifold oppressions that exist in society today. To be clear, when I say privileged, I am not talking about the upper-class “1 percenters” that we see in shows like Gossip Girl. I’m talking about white people, men, straight people, cisgender people, thin people, able-bodied people, and people who might not necessarily be rich, but don’t want for basic needs such as food and shelter. This statement alone might turn off a lot of you reading this — I know from experience that being reminded of privilege is not only uncomfortable, but is often, amazingly, viewed as boring or irrelevant.

Read more from feminspire here : Privilege Discomfort: Why You Need to Get the Fuck Over It