indigenist

Advocating for Indigenous Genius, Indigeneity and Wellbeing


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10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence for Men

10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence

How do you know if you are in an abusive relationship—or headed down that certain path? Trust your instincts. Survivors of domestic violence say that they knew something wasn’t right, but ignored the following patterns of behavior that they later recognized as potential early warning signs that the person they were dating would turn out to be abusers.

Someone who exhibits the behavior outlined below is either abusive or could become so.

• Rages out of control and is impulsive
• Gets angry so easily that you feel like you’re “walking on eggshells”
• Calls you names such as “stupid” or “dumb,” “arsehole”, “wanker” or tells you that you are “crazy”
• Wants to move too quickly into the relationship
• Is excessively jealous and wants to know where you are all of the time
• Takes no responsibility for her behavior and blames others
• Grew up in an abusive or violent home
• Insists that you stop spending time with your friends or family
• Insists that you stop participating in leisure interests
• Hits walls, drive dangerously, or does other things to scare you

National counselling helpline, information and support 24/7 1800RESPECT

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#HeyPal is a conversation starter about Men’s Mental Wellness and Suicide Prevention. A simple Hey Pal is all it can take.

This has been adapted from “10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence” and you can read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/23/10-early-warning-signs-domestic-violence-157971


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In Search Of Your Warrior Program was created to treat traumatic experiences, to heal the scars of abuse…

“In Search Of Your Warrior Program was created to treat traumatic experiences, to heal the scars of abuse, to get rid of the blinding rage and anger that inmates carry deep inside.”

The In Search of Your Warrior Program Identity at the heart of healing.

Enhanced capacities to provide effective interventions for First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders.

The Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) provides a continuum of culturally appropriate interventions that address the specific needs of First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders in a way that contributes to safe and healthy communities. In particular, over the last decade, CSC has created eight healing lodges across Canada. Let’s Talk writers recently visited one of them, the Pê Sâkâstêw Healing Lodge in Alberta, where staff and offenders spoke of the benefits of the holistic approach and the rehabilitation programs, in particular the In Search of Your Warrior Program (ISYW).

In Search of Your Warrior Program


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CQQC2015 Decolonising Post-settler Indigenous Masculinity.

Cultured Queers/Queer Cultures [DRAFT]

Title: Decolonising Post-settler Indigenous Masculinity.

Like many things, culture included, masculinity has changed over time. It too has shown to be dynamic. Tenga (Hawaii 2008), McKeney (Turlte Island 2014 ), Driskell (Turtle Island 2011) and Hokowhitu (New Zealand 2012) are notable international scholars of Indigenous masculinities and highlight this throughout their work. However Indigenous masculinity within a post-settler Australian context has never really been formally challenged or unpacked from an Indigenous Australian male perspective. My question is how much of an influence has colonial settlement in Australia affected pre-settler ideas of Indigenous masculinity. When we look at pre-settler roles and responsibilities available, there is evidence that some defy today’s gender norms. So what does that tell us about the contemporary Indigenous masculinity ? Is it perhaps that perhaps that hegemony of masculinity has made us, as Indigenous males inefficient because we hold our actions and behaviours accountable to colonial views and gender and sexuality ? By using Indigenous Standpoint Theory (Martin 2007) as decolonising practice I will endeavour to implement an auto-ethnographic lens and ask that we re-vision Indigenous masculinity and that we re-think and re-imagine our roles and relationships. But, most importantly we explore what the implications, are, both negative and positive, when our being cannot be disconnected from contemporary society.