indigenist

Advocating for Indigenous Genius, Indigeneity and Wellbeing


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Violence against women and its link with sports – HT @JackHockman

SAY NO TO MAYWEATHER
IT IS TIME ALL SPORTING CODES SAID NO MORE
Just when you thought the disrespect from sporting codes for women could get no worse we get the announcement of Floyd Mayweather to tour Australia. He surely is the poster boy for Violence against women a history of violence, that not even incarceration could change his attitude to women. As a boxing fan the shame that he and those grubby promoters behind this tour bring to the sport is beyond belief. At a time when boxing in Australia is on the verge of a new revival led by so many who do the right thing with dedication, hard training and respect for others that we should go down the road of disrespectful charlatans who put themselves before all others is a disgrace. I have e-mailed the Immigration Minister Peter Dutton urging him to not allow this tour to happen and I urge you to do the same. The address is minister@immi.gov.au

It is not only boxing that has this type of Issue it is virtually every sporting code and it is time we all played a part in the changing of that attitude. This is not just about respect for women but also about what we want our next generation of men to be by stopping Mayweather coming to Australia is a message that our youth need to see. As I said it is not just boxing it is all codes that must change and that change must start with us the fans following is a few examples and my thoughts of changes that must happen to help end the cycle of violence against women. Sports people should never be the role models, parents should be, however if children observe their parents and society cheering these people who should be pariahs then we will see the cycle continue.
Where to start when looking at other codes would seem obvious with the actions of the NFL this year. Where there were so many cases and different often bewildering responses to domestic violence and other issues. Most would of seen the Ray Rice incident where he knocked his then fiancé now his wife out in an elevator well Ray Rice is free to play again in the NFL after his appeal was upheld. The fact that initially his suspension was only 2 weeks should be the commissioners reason to resign, however this won’t happen as neither he nor the NFL ownership groups have any respect for women, Other than as a revenue source or as trophies for these billionaires and millionaires to display.
All codes have histories of protecting the perpetrators of violence against women and victim blaming at their core. The fact that the worst offenders are also the major codes in their countries or provinces from NFL in the USA, to Association football in many countries, and shamefully, in Australia, the NRL, and AFL. All of these codes have sham Womens days or rounds where they in an attempt to drag more $$$$ into their pockets claim to show respect for women.
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So where does the responsibility lie, with the Judiciary, leagues, broadcasters, sponsors, clubs, players, or in truth the fans. All are culpable in their willingness to defend the star player while trampling on the dignity of all women.
For the Judiciary it should be easy prosecute and sentence when found guilty. Unfortunately it doesn’t happen that way. Fan boy judges have made a mockery of the legal system to such a point that I could not use the term justice system, as for women who have been abused and subjected to violence by players there is no justice.

For the leagues themselves it is time they realized that their continuing to allow those who commit these acts to have the privilege of playing must end. The excuses used to justify these offenders to continue to play would be laughable, but assaulting women is no laughing matter. The parade of players who‘s wives girlfriends withdraw or don’t press charges is endless, and the pressure put on these victims is a disgrace.
The Broadcasters while ever they continue to have a blokes culture and jobs for the boys mentality, the story will remain the same. Watch most shows based around the players and ex-players and if you get ten minutes in without having at least one sexist comment I would be amazed.
The advertisers and sponsors must be made to see that endorsing abuse of women by allowing their corporate brand to be associated with Leagues and teams, who condone this abuse, will eventually leave a stain on their brands too large to ignore.
That clubs in the week that they were endorsing White Ribbon Day were signing or in the throes of wooing offenders to their clubs. This far more than their empty words show the true nature of the clubs opinion of women and where they stand in the game.
The players again so many players made statements on White Ribbon Day of No to Violence against Women. These same players who happily play with offenders, and so quickly anytime that one of their teammates offend leap to his defense, while just as quickly sowing the seeds for victim shaming so that their thug mate walks free.
The fans are perhaps the worst of all, for if the fans stop accepting this behavior from all the preceding groups change will happen. If a Player offends or is happy playing with offenders don’t cheer them. If your club plays offenders don’t buy memberships or merchandise. If advertisers and sponsors are unwilling to make a moral stand don’t buy their products. If broadcasters refuse to change their practices change the channel. If leagues won’t take action simply don’t go to games in particular rep football, where it clearly falls on the league, if they allow offenders to play at that level. The judiciary here to we the fans can make a change, let Governments know that we will not accept sentencing that is of another standard for players. These Judges must be held to account and the only way we can ensure this is through the ballot box if governments don’t act.
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It is clear that all of us are to blame, in some way judges, leagues players, fans and the rest but in all this there is one group not to blame nor should they ever be blamed and that is the Victims.
Say no to Violence Against Women say no to Victim Shaming.


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10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence for Men

10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence

How do you know if you are in an abusive relationship—or headed down that certain path? Trust your instincts. Survivors of domestic violence say that they knew something wasn’t right, but ignored the following patterns of behavior that they later recognized as potential early warning signs that the person they were dating would turn out to be abusers.

Someone who exhibits the behavior outlined below is either abusive or could become so.

• Rages out of control and is impulsive
• Gets angry so easily that you feel like you’re “walking on eggshells”
• Calls you names such as “stupid” or “dumb,” “arsehole”, “wanker” or tells you that you are “crazy”
• Wants to move too quickly into the relationship
• Is excessively jealous and wants to know where you are all of the time
• Takes no responsibility for her behavior and blames others
• Grew up in an abusive or violent home
• Insists that you stop spending time with your friends or family
• Insists that you stop participating in leisure interests
• Hits walls, drive dangerously, or does other things to scare you

National counselling helpline, information and support 24/7 1800RESPECT

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#HeyPal is a conversation starter about Men’s Mental Wellness and Suicide Prevention. A simple Hey Pal is all it can take.

This has been adapted from “10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence” and you can read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/23/10-early-warning-signs-domestic-violence-157971


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The Harmless Homophobic Tweet or the Selective Blindness of Rape Culture.

When violence is entrenched to the point of invisibility

The Harmless Homophobic Tweet or the Selective Blindness of Rape Culture

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The Kissing Sailor, or “The Selective Blindness of Rape Culture”

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Most of us are familiar with this picture. Captured in Times Square on V-J Day, 1945, it has become one of the most iconic photographs of American history, symbolizing the jubilation and exuberance felt throughout the country at the end of World War II.

For a long time, the identity of the pair remained a mystery. It certainly looks passionate and romantic enough, with many speculating that they were a couple – a sailor and a nurse, celebrating and sharing their joy. This year, however, historians have finally confirmed that the woman is Greta Zimmer Friedman, a dental nurse at the time, and George Mendonsa, a sailor.

Greta’s experience:

“It wasn’t my choice to be kissed. The guy just came over and grabbed!”

“I did not see him approaching, and before I knew it, I was in this vice grip.”

“You don’t forget this guy grabbing you.”

“That man was very strong. I wasn’t kissing him. He was kissing me.”

More here at Huff Post


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CQQC2015 Decolonising Post-settler Indigenous Masculinity.

Cultured Queers/Queer Cultures [DRAFT]

Title: Decolonising Post-settler Indigenous Masculinity.

Like many things, culture included, masculinity has changed over time. It too has shown to be dynamic. Tenga (Hawaii 2008), McKeney (Turlte Island 2014 ), Driskell (Turtle Island 2011) and Hokowhitu (New Zealand 2012) are notable international scholars of Indigenous masculinities and highlight this throughout their work. However Indigenous masculinity within a post-settler Australian context has never really been formally challenged or unpacked from an Indigenous Australian male perspective. My question is how much of an influence has colonial settlement in Australia affected pre-settler ideas of Indigenous masculinity. When we look at pre-settler roles and responsibilities available, there is evidence that some defy today’s gender norms. So what does that tell us about the contemporary Indigenous masculinity ? Is it perhaps that perhaps that hegemony of masculinity has made us, as Indigenous males inefficient because we hold our actions and behaviours accountable to colonial views and gender and sexuality ? By using Indigenous Standpoint Theory (Martin 2007) as decolonising practice I will endeavour to implement an auto-ethnographic lens and ask that we re-vision Indigenous masculinity and that we re-think and re-imagine our roles and relationships. But, most importantly we explore what the implications, are, both negative and positive, when our being cannot be disconnected from contemporary society.


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I’m glad @3ree6ixty showed up on my Twitter feed. Preach.

“I used to use homophobic slurs all the time in battle rap, in everyday talking to my mates and stuff like that. And I was young. I was very ignorant, you know, and then I got interviewed by a gay man and he said to me, ‘do you understand your power with kids and how much influence you have on these kids? You’re saying a word like faggot and it teaches them that it’s okay’. And then – ever since then it just changed me. I think the only way you can beat ignorance is with education and ever since then I have – I’ve realised the position that I was in and I wanted to – I was like a role model for young kids, so I want to be a positive one, you know. I don’t want to be a negative one. So that just changed everything for me after that. You know, I realised I was ignorant. I realised that was stupid, but I grew up and moved on.”

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Website : http://www.360music.com.au

There’s also this from his facebook page.

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Preach indeed.


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[Survey] Exploring Indigenous Masculinity in Australia – For Indigenous Australians Males Only

Exploring Indigenous Masculinity in Australia – For Indigenous Australians Males Only.

I am an Indigenous Male and this is a preliminary survey that will assist me with constructing a presentation on Indigenous Masculinity that I will be giving in 2015.

All answers are anonymous. Your contribution is voluntary. This is insider research.

Please take this survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/8H3V7S7

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Why we need safe houses for Aboriginal men. They are victims too.

Pain of Aboriginal men abused by their women By Corey Sinclair

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Tony Linn co-ordinator of Ingkintja Men’s Health.

DOMESTIC violence against men is just as common as it is for women in some Aboriginal communities.

But Aboriginal men are hesitant to speak up because they fear being “shame jobs”.

Former Pioneer footballer Geoffrey Miller says there is a lack of services in Central Australia that can effectively deal with these issues men face.

“When I was working with DASA (Drug & Alcohol Services Association), it was the main problem we had,” he said.

“Women have their own legal aid and shelter — it’s all in place, but for men — there’s no shelter.

“What we used to call the men’s shelter was the prison cause that was the only place to go, even if it’s not their fault.

“If they stepped off their track, they ended up in prison — not a shelter.”

Miller, who previously won a Prime Minister’s Award for providing excellence in service to the community, said a men’s shelter would address a lot of issues that happen in town, like the anti-social behaviour and drinking in the streets.

“When men get kicked out of a home, the worst thing is they walk around the streets and get themselves in that position again,” he said.

“If they had a shelter to go to, they could spend a night there and they’d find where some of the anger in these men are coming from.

“That’s where the big downfall is when they get depressed, they have nowhere to go.

“There’s little things no one has spent time to assess.”

Miller believes the root of the problem is the shift in Aboriginal culture from the men being the bread earners to the women.

“Back in the old days, men were the head of the family but nowadays, that’s taken away from them with pensions and not enough jobs,” he said.

“Men feel lower cause they’re not getting the income his wife is getting, and some wives or partners can be really nasty in that aspect.

“They keep them in their place cause they know they can.

“The men, a lot of the time, will stay cause there’s kids involved or they have nowhere to go.”

But the problem is not just restricted to Aboriginal men.

Miller knows a lot of white men going through similar problems.

“It’s across the board,” he said.

Congress’ Ingkintja Men’s Health’s senior psychologist Max Yffer said they often see men who are victims of interpersonal violence.

“The vast majority are women but it is very difficult for all people to come forward, and that is true across the whole community — not just Aboriginal people,” he said.

“But particularly with Aboriginal people, there is a very strong sense of shame.”

Some of the men who are referred to Mr Yffer as offenders or as the protagonist will often say their female partners had a go at them as well.

“I think there is a broader problem of men feeling a bit lost in their role in society, particularly some men who are caught between a couple of different cultures,” he said.

“Not wanting to steer away from their traditional culture and become more urbanised.”

Mr Yffer agrees that a men’s shelter would be beneficial for Alice Springs.

“It’s something that is talked about a lot,” he said.

“There is the Salvation Army’s men’s hostel but it’s not quite the same as the women’s shelter.

“It doesn’t have quite the same protective aura the women’s shelter does so I think there is definitely a need for a place for men to feel safer.”

Domestic violence related assault in Alice Springs rose 15.2 per cent in 2013.

It is believed one in three victims of family violence and abuse are male.

A study by Edith Cowan University (ECU) confirmed that abused men have almost no services to help them despite also suffering from physical, emotional, verbal, sexual financial and social abuse like women.

Pain of Aboriginal men abused by their women


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(Video) The only prelude needed for Cage-Fighting Poet -Cameron Conaway’s memoir “Caged” + Book Review

Caged – Memoirs of a Cage-Fighting Poet – A Review

Cameron Conaway reaching out to his dad


The Good Men Project is the link between Cameron Conaway and myself. I’m not sure when that link was made and why out of all the contributors to GMP that I began following Cameron on twitter. Maybe it was the Cage Fighter slash Poet paradox that intrigued me.

And that he looks more like a Poet than a Cage Fighter.

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But even when Cameron was fighting and looking like a Cage Fighter than Poet he was writing poems and into poetry.

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I’ve not been one for poetry really. Not writing nor reading it. Mainly because I think it’s because there’s nary been a poem or poetry style that’s attracted me to it. Reading Caged has changed that. I don’t think that I will now suddenly become a poet, even though I’ve had a crack here. But I will write shit down. There’s a style that Cameron refers to early in his book, or as he writes it’s a “tactic” poets use called Enjambent. I like it. And like I said, I’ll give it a crack.

I know I’m going to read Caged again. The first lines I drew my pencil under were on page 8 – The Warrior Spirit. But they were also the last. I wanted to read the book, not study it this first time round. The purposeful intricacies of MMA and BJJ as life metaphors that Cameron brings to light amazed me. It’s like he’s created a road map to life or at least a guide to perhaps follow or a stencil to which colour in however you want. Hell, even colour outside of it.

Admittedly while reading Caged I didn’t feel inspired but rather validated within my own sense of maleness and masculinity. But towards the end I did get inspired. Inspired to write more. This year I’ve really only just gotten into it (writing). My third for the GMP is coming up and an Op Ed I wrote has been widely circulated. Plus a Book Review for a Medical Journal should be out in the coming months.

The next time I read Caged though, will be with pencil, ruler and notepad. There is so much to unpack and explore and reflect upon. Well, for me anyways.

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The biggest reward for me from reading this book is that I’m excited about poetry, as a method of story telling.

Cameron’s website is here

Cameron has a new book of poetry out on November 1st called Malaria Poems.

Malaria ? Poems ? How’s that for a juxtaposition.

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I bought my copy of Caged from Bookktopia but you can also get it via Amazon

Here you can find my first two pieces for the Good Men Project the third is on its way. Here is also a piece that the GMP passed on Robin Williams, Henry Rollins, Men and Depression

Cheers, Dameyon

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Canadian Programs designed to assist Aboriginal people who are caught in the cycle of violence.

The In Search of Your Warrior program (men), Spirit of A Warrior Program (women) and the TAPWE Youth Warrior Program (youth) were designed by Native Counselling Services of Alberta, to assist Aboriginal people who are caught in the cycle of violence. The Warrior programs usually requires 30 days to complete, based upon a six-hour program day. The programs are founded on the basic principles of Natural Law (caring, kindness, respect, love and self-determination), which are learned through ceremony and ritual. The Warrior Program is delivered by two trained facilitators, under the guidance and with the participation of an Elder; the typical group size is 10 – 14 participants.

The program has three primary goals:

To assist Aboriginal people to better understand their personal intergenerational cycle of violent behaviour. This includes: defining family violence; identifying the roots of their violent behaviour; considering the family/community context within which violence occurs; addressing feelings of vulnerability related to their experiences of victimization; and distinguishing between anger and rage.

To build knowledge and skills that will reduce and eventually eliminate violent behaviour in program participants.

To facilitate the participants’ connection and commitment to their life-long healing journey.

Program Process

The ISOYW program is founded in holistic Aboriginal philosophy: the belief that all things are connected and that for sustainable change to occur, an individual must engage the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects of self in the changing/learning/healing process. The program process includes activities and sessions that provide opportunities for such holistic learning. The process also includes daily ritual, frequent ceremony (chosen and led by the Elder), and sessions that encourage participants to explore core issues that underlie violent behaviour, such as their childhood experiences of violence, grief and loss, shame, trauma, childhood neglect and abandonment, as well as triggers for violent behaviour. Further, the participants learn about the intergenerational effects of colonization on the Aboriginal individual, family and community. In this process, the participant identifies his own cycle of violence and then can develop skills that will enable him to live a non-violent lifestyle.

The Warrior Programs employ a highly kinaesthetic and experiential learning process.

The Warrior Program sessions employ the rules and process of the sharing circle.

Warrior Facilitators

The men and women who facilitate Warrior program are highly skilled guides, role models and facilitators. Facilitators of the ISOYW program therefore require many important skills and characteristics:

· an in-depth, first-hand understanding of the healing process;
· knowledge of where they are on their own healing path;
· the capacity to take care of themselves emotionally and spiritually throughout the program; and
· the ability to motivate participants to engage in their healing journey.

Native Counselling Services of Alberta retains full responsibility for the Warrior programs; to this end we provide certification for people who have completed the program (Participant Certification), for those who successfully complete the facilitators training (Facilitator Certification) and for those who are responsible for the training of facilitators (Trainer Certification).

NCSA can provide the following services for communities and organizations:

Program Facilitation
NCSA can send facilitators to an organization or community to provide the Warrior programs. We work with the organization to recruit appropriate program participants, choose program location, ensure all necessary program resources are available, prepare community Elders to be a part of the program and provide the Certification of Program Completion for participants who successfully complete.

Facilitator Training

NCSA can help communities and organizations build capacity to facilitate the Warrior programs regularly for their membership or clientele. NCSA will help the organizations choose appropriate facilitator trainees, choose the training location, ensure all resources are available for the training and provide the Facilitator Certificates for the trainees that successfully complete training.

BearPaw Peacemaking Certificate Program