indigenist

Advocating for Indigenous Genius, Indigeneity and Wellbeing


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Panel Discussion – #ATSISPEP My contribution, edited for this posting.

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Diversity Consciousness – Inclusive Workplaces Increasing Health and Productivity 

The Pride in Practice Conference – Diversity into Consciousness 

With diversity an ever increasing need in the workplace, Dameyon Bonson, a Mangarayi and Torres Strait Islander man believes that it is only through inclusive practices that this can this be fully realised. If an inclusive world can provide better health outcomes, so too can an inclusive workplace. In 2013, Dameyon founded Black Rainbow Living Well for Indigenous LGBTI Suicide Prevention and Wellbeing. In this session, Dameyon will draw on his lived professional experience in the corporate, government and NGO sector, as an Indigenous gay man, to provide workplaces with the absolute fundamentals of healthy diversity in the workplace.

SESSION 4: Diversity of Consciousness, Black Rainbow 

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Pride in Diversity | Equality in the Workplace

Pride in Diversity is Australia’s first and only national not-for-profit employer support program for all aspects of LGBTI workplace inclusion. Specialists in HR, organisational change and workplace diversity, Pride in Diversity has established itself as an internationally recognised program and a partner to many LGBTI employer support organisations across the globe.

The Pride in Practice Conference will take place from Monday 30th November – Wednesday 2nd December. To download a full copy of the Full Program here.

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Guys, hugging it out is a powerful anti-depressant

The Power of a Simple Hug as a Natural Anti-Depressant

There is real biological power in the simple act of a hug. It can melt away the stress from a day. It can lend itself to repairing emotional wounds.

There’s really nothing like the power of a big supportive hug. The body reads a sense of caring in the human touch. When we’re hugged we sense that on a deep level, we are not alone. In some ways it’s a shame that in our relationships with healing professionals hugging is often advised against. There are so many wonderful stories where hugging has been a healing modality.

The Science and Practice of a Hug

In one study published in Nature Communications, researchers injected the hormone Oxytocin in older mice with muscle damage. After nine days, the older mice healed faster than the younger, more strapping, mice. These older mice could repair muscle damage up to 80 percent better than the younger mice.

There is real biological power in the simple act of a hug. It can melt away the stress from a day. It can lend itself to repairing emotional wounds.

A hug has the power to release Oxytocin, which sets us up to feel more balanced and soothed the moment we do it. It can strengthen relationships and lend itself toward forgiveness. If you give a hug to another person until both bodies relax, it also allows you to feel more connected, as now your nervous systems are aligned.

Try: At some point throughout the day, see if there’s someone you can hug. This can be a friend, your partner, a child, or even a pet. If a colleague is open to it, you can try that too. Bring mindfulness to it: Be aware of the sensation of the hug, what emotions are present, and what thoughts arise.

If you there’s a barrier to hugging or you don’t have someone you feel comfortable doing so in the moment, it’s not all lost. Studies show that imagining actions stimulates the same parts of the brain as actually doing them. If you don’t have someone to hug at home, imagine hugging another person, hug yourself, or perhaps set the intention to hug others more often.

The point here is to practice nurturing the release of this natural antidepressant.

You likely know this to be true, but test it out during this time and see what you notice.

As always, please share your thoughts, stories, and questions below. Your interaction creates a living wisdom for us all to benefit from.

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10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence for Men

10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence

How do you know if you are in an abusive relationship—or headed down that certain path? Trust your instincts. Survivors of domestic violence say that they knew something wasn’t right, but ignored the following patterns of behavior that they later recognized as potential early warning signs that the person they were dating would turn out to be abusers.

Someone who exhibits the behavior outlined below is either abusive or could become so.

• Rages out of control and is impulsive
• Gets angry so easily that you feel like you’re “walking on eggshells”
• Calls you names such as “stupid” or “dumb,” “arsehole”, “wanker” or tells you that you are “crazy”
• Wants to move too quickly into the relationship
• Is excessively jealous and wants to know where you are all of the time
• Takes no responsibility for her behavior and blames others
• Grew up in an abusive or violent home
• Insists that you stop spending time with your friends or family
• Insists that you stop participating in leisure interests
• Hits walls, drive dangerously, or does other things to scare you

National counselling helpline, information and support 24/7 1800RESPECT

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#HeyPal is a conversation starter about Men’s Mental Wellness and Suicide Prevention. A simple Hey Pal is all it can take.

This has been adapted from “10 Early Warning Signs of Domestic Violence” and you can read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/23/10-early-warning-signs-domestic-violence-157971


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When oppression is underlying cause of mental health unrest in Indigenous people we need to name it a mental injury, not an illness.

When oppression is underlying cause of mental health unrest in Indigenous people we need to name it a mental injury, not an illness.

It’s not something that was caught or a disease. It’s something that has happened.

Eradicating oppression is the first step to the eradication mental injury and mental health unrest.

Eradicating oppression is suicide prevention.

© Indigenist™ 2014


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Decolonisation and Neo-Cultural Gender Expression and Identity – Workshop

Decolonisation and Neo-Cultural Gender Expression and Identity

Within Indigenous Australian cultures the discourse on sexuality and gender outside of western constraints is extremely limited. When sexuality is discussed it is more often than not in the registers of pathology that in turn speaks to a heterocentric discourse. This session will use a six stages of decolonisation process, by Dr Lorraine Muller, as a response to the cultural challenges and to identify strengths in Indigenous *LGBT people. LGBQT is presupposed as counterfeit descriptor that misconstrues pre-settler colonial Indigenous gender variance and diverse sexualities. This session will explore the idea of “Neo-Cultural Gender Expression and Identity” as a dynamic part of our cultural evolution.