indigenist

Advocating for Indigenous Genius, Indigeneity and Wellbeing


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Please heed this message if you plan on working with Indigenous people or communities

If you’ve come here to help me…

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Participating with the view of being part of the liberation of Indigenous people is the single most overlooked and fundamental principle of genuinely inclusive work. Being part of the liberation is also knowing when you are required and a good indication of that is when you have been asked. Don’t let an over-zealous sense of entitlement to charity or benevolence be your motivation. Also pay attention to the research. Cultural continuity is a protective factor

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You are loved You are wanted…So live long and let’s keep culture strong

You are loved

You are loved
You are wanted
You are unique
You are beautiful
You are family
You are community
You are worth it
So live long
And let’s keep culture strong
Because you’re worth it.
We are all worth it.

©Indigenist


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I’m a self funded Indigenous LGBTI Suicide Prevention researcher, please assist if you can

World Suicide Prevention Day 2014 Indigenous LGBTI Suicide Prevention fundraiser
Hi, I am a self funded Indigenous LGBQTI Suicide Prevention researcher. I raise money through tee spring to continue my research and endeavour to attract more funding to the Indigenous LGBQTI Suicide Prevention space. Currently, I am the only person looking specifically at this population group. I am a gay Indigenous male and we are losing to many of our mob to suicide. If you can, please buy a t-short from here

This is the design

WSPD14 Front

WSPD14 Back

©Indigenist


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Enhancing Indigenous #SuicidePrevention to be more culturally responsive

From Tokenism to Citizenship

Enhancing Indigenous #SuicidePrevention to be more culturally responsive

8) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities -initiated, shared decisions with mainstream organisations. – This happens when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities initiate projects or programs and decision-making is shared between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities and mainstream organisations. These projects empower /authoritise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities while at the same time enabling them to access and learn from the reciprocal sharing of experience and expertise of mainstream organisations.

7) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities -initiated and directed – This step is when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities initiate and direct a project or program. Mainstream organisations are involved only in a supportive role.

6) Mainstream organisations and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities –initiated; thinking together, sharing decisions – Occurs when projects or programs are initiated by both mainstream organisations and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities and the decision-making is shared with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and communities.

5) Consulted and informed – Happens when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People give advice on projects or programs designed and run by mainstream organisations. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males are informed about how their input will be used and the outcomes of the decisions made by mainstream organisations.
4) Assigned but informed – This is where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are assigned a specific role and informed about how and why they are being involved.

3) Tokenism – When Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People appear to be given a voice, but in fact have little or no choice about what they do or how they participate.

2) Decoration – Happens when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are used to help or “bolster” a cause/intention in a relatively indirect way, although mainstream organisations do not pretend that the cause/intention is inspired by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male.

1) Manipulation – Happens where non- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People use Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People to support causes and pretend that the causes are inspired by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

REF : Ladder_of_Participation_1

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Working in Indigenous suicide prevention, projects need to demonstrate the following via The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy has a holistic and early intervention focus that works to build strong communities through more community-focused and integrated approaches to suicide prevention.

Projects need to demonstrate:

Community control and empowerment: projects should be grounded in community, owned
by the community, based on community needs and accountable to the community.

Holistic: based on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander definitions of health incorporating
spirituality, culture and healing.

Sustainable, strength based and capacity building: projects must be sustainable both in
terms of building community capacity and in terms of not being ‘one off’; they must endure until the community is empowered. For example providing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforces and community members with tools for awareness, early identification and for responding to self-harm issues within the community.

Partnerships: projects should work in genuine partnerships with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholders and other providers to support and enhance existing local measures, not duplicate or compete with them. Funding applications need to demonstrate a record of genuine community and stakeholder/provider consultations and a track record of community empowerment.

Safe cultural delivery: projects should be delivered in a safe manner.

Innovation and evaluation: projects need to build on learnings, try new and innovative approaches, share learnings, and improve the evidence base.

Community Promotion and education: projects should share learnings and these should be promoted in other communities.

The Strategy has been informed by extensive community consultation with 14 community meetings held across Australia attended by 446 people, a national expert workshop, and a website that received 48 contributions directly from the community.

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Suicide prevention strategy targets ATSI communities

“Suicide is robbing young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of their lives,” Social Justice Commissioner Mick Gooda said today.

Responding to the launch of the first National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy, Commissioner Gooda said the unnecessary loss is taking a devastating toll on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

“The national strategy announced today will help build strength and resilience within individuals and within our communities.

“We need this strategy because it will provide targeted suicide prevention services that help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities,” Commissioner Good said.

“Addressing suicide in our communities is a critical initiative if we are to achieve health equality and close the life expectancy gap by 2030,” Commissioner Gooda said.

Commissioner Gooda’s predecessor as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, Dr Tom Calma AO, chaired the working group that oversaw the development of the national strategy.

Dr Calma also welcomed today’s announcement of $17.8 million over 4 years to fund the national strategy.

“Suicide affects all Australians, but occurs among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples at twice the national average.

“We hope today draws a line in the sand in relation to the unacceptably high rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicide. It is our hope that today heralds the end of that awful and unnecessary burden of loss, pain and suffering for our peoples,” Dr Calma said.


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I’m taking part in the World Suicide Prevention Day Cycle Around the Globe

World Suicide Prevention Day – 10 September, 2014 Cycle Around the Globe

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Following last year’s pilot cycle activity, IASP is again this year hosting Cycle Around the Globe for World Suicide Prevention Day. This year, it is free to participate; all you need is access to a bicycle.

The challenge is to collectively cycle the circumference of the globe, 40,075 km or 24,900 miles, and to have participants cycling on every continent. Please join us; it does not matter how far you can cycle; every km or mile will help and there are no limits, you can cycle at home, in the gym or outdoors.

This activity is all about the global community spreading awareness of the importance of suicide prevention. This year’s theme for World Suicide Prevention Day is Suicide Prevention: One World Connected, and this is an activity that connects us in our purpose.

You may wish to take this opportunity to raise money for your local or national suicide prevention charity or similar organization. A sponsorship form is available below to print off to help you collect donations. If you wish to donate to IASP, all donations would be gratefully received.

Also below is an Official Participant label, which can be printed off and attached to your top whilst you are cycling, and a Certificate, which can be printed and filled in once you have completed your cycle. If you are arranging a group activity you may wish to hand out the labels to your group, at the start and, certificates at the finish.

This is a great opportunity to spread the word of suicide prevention. We have WSPD banners and Light a Candle postcards in many different languages on our website http://www.iasp.info/wspd, which can be printed and handed out, as well as lots more information on World Suicide Prevention Day.

We will, of course, be spreading the word on social media as much as possible. Please let us know how you get on, send in your photos and confirm how far you cycled and we will try to put together a total distance. We would also appreciate your support in promoting the cycle. Please tell others about the activity and encourage them to join in and, if you use social media please feel free to spread the word.

Join us and Cycle for WSPD and show the world that we are all connected in the aim of preventing suicide.

Cycle Around the Globe

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#WatchListenAsk The Problematising of Men in Mental Health and Suicide Prevention

Watch. Listen. Ask. The Problematising of Men in Mental Health and Suicide Prevention ©Indigenist

I’ve been working in health and human service provision for a while now. The last three years I’ve been working across the North-West of Australia, the Kimberely. I travelled 35,000km in my first 18 months delivering upstream suicide prevention, conversation and consultation and the Aboriginal Mental Health First Aid.

During my career if there is one thing that bugs me is the problematising of men. It has been so ingrained that “men don’t talk”, most people aren’t even listening. Least of all listen with the intent to understand. Most often they are listening with the intent to reply or to “fix”.

Men account for three out of every five deaths by suicide, making suicide the 10th leading cause of death for males.

In Australia, for those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent, the suicide rate is 2.5 times higher.

In the UK Suicide is the biggest killer of men under 50.

If men aren’t accessing your mental health service and they really should be (see stats above) you’re not doing it right.

You’re a hard to reach service. Period.

It was recently passed onto me the teachings of Davey Lawrence an Aboriginal Elder of the Girramay peoples; “you have to listen to what a person does – not what they say”.

I reckon that’s pretty sound advice.

Here’s what I suggest you do.

Watch men. Watch how they are behaving. See their emotions in their behaviours.

Listen to men. Listen to what they are saying, not what you are wanting or expecting to them to say.

Ask men if things are ok. If you’ve gotten to this step there’s a pretty good chance that something is up. In their response whether it is yes or no, watch and listen to what they say. If they’ve said yes, let them guide you on how you can best support them.

Now this isn’t literal. Verbal communication isn’t the only way men communicate. So trust yourself and your instincts. If you’re wrong there is a good chance you’ll be told. If they say no, that nothing is up still trust your instincts. Because if you’ve been watching and listening you’re going to be pretty much on the money. So continue to Watch, Listen and Ask.

The most important thing for anyone is to know you don’t have to through it alone. Men are no different.

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©Indigenist